Persuasive Visions

The 5th edition of Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance (NoMAA)’s public art initiative.
Guest curator Stephanie Lindquist
Sunday November 4, 1:30 pm Artist Talk with: Nick Kozak and Gina Goico
Northern End of Inwood Hill Park (enter at Indian Road and 218th Street)

The 5th edition of Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance (NoMAA)’s public art initiative.
Guest curator Stephanie Lindquist
Northern end of Inwood Hill Park (enter at Indian Road and 218th Street)
ON VIEW UNTIL MARCH 2019
Inspired by W. E. B. Du Bois’s conviction that propaganda through the arts can create social change, Persuasive Visions presents the work of two local artists, Gina Goico and Nick Kozak, who respond to today’s constant deluge of (mis)information.

Gina Goico www.ginagoico.com
Sanar
As we are inundated daily with media Gina Goico reminds us of the power of cleansing ourselves and holding space for our community. In this case, she invited neighbors to reconnect through conversation and collaboration creating traditional Dominican pellizas that read “reconocer para sanar”/ “recognize to heal” in her installation Sanar.

Nick Kozak www.kozakartclass.com
Opposition Position
Nick Kozak’s installation Opposition Position challenges us to examine our education system and to stage our own educational interactions in this classroom in the park.

All are welcome to attend free workshops led by local students on the first Saturday of the month through March of 2019 FINAL WORKSHOP will be Saturday March 9. RSVP HERE

This holiday season we were shocked to find the social sculpture Opposition Position uprooted in Inwood Hill Park. Created by artist Nick Kozak, this public art work is activated by local high school students every month through dialogue around topics that matter most to youth and the community: health, safety, education, communication, technology, and identity.

In the days after we were also heartened to see neighbors take ownership of this social sculpture by carefully arranging the chairs and desk of this classroom in the park back to its original layout.

Opposition Position will continue to be on view at the northern entrance of Inwood Hill Park through March 2019./span>


Made possible with support from NYC Department of Small Business Services N360 Grant, Con Edison and New York City Department of Parks & Recreation. This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council

Women in the Heights: Resistance

Women in the Heights: Resistance Curated by Andrea Arroyo. On view March 8-28. Artist Talk and Workshop March 28.

The Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance (NoMAA), in partnership with Broadway Housing Communities and The Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling invites you to “Women in the Heights- Resistance“, an exhibition featuring work by women artists of Northern Manhattan. Curated by Andrea Arroyo

Exhibit dates: March 8-28, 2018
March 28, 6:30-8:30 Closing, Artist Talk and Workshop “Artivism- How to develop and fund your project” with curator Andrea Arroyo.​  RSVP required

Vivian Abuelo, Gloria Adams, Abigail Arguilla, Julie Berman, Chelsea Best, Lenore Browne, Rose Deler, Wilhelmina Grant, Yeiry Guevara, C’naan Hamburger, Selina Hernandez, Maggie Hernandez, Andrea Kornbluth, Lilia Levin, Najá Lewis, Marne Lucas, Nancy Mercado, Alexandra Momin, Ashanti Muniz, Rosa Naparstek, Nancy Palubniak, Nancy Rakoczy, Diana Schmertz, Tasuyo Tanaka, Joana Toro, Ruthy Valdez and Tamara Wasserman

RIO II Gallery
583 Riverside Dr (at 135 St) NY NY

 

Sugar hill Children's Museum of Art and Storytelling
Broadway Housing Communities

 

 

 

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

 

Funding also provided by the Office of Assemblywoman Carmen De La Rosa.

NoMAA exhibition: Women in the Heights – Disruption

In celebration of Women’s History Month, NoMAA presents the exhibition “Women in the Heights – Disruption,” featuring the work of 28 women artists of Uptown Manhattan. Curated by Andrea Arroyo. Dates: 10–30 March 2017. Opening reception: Friday 10 March. Artists talk and workshop: Wednesday 22 March.

Women in the Heights 2017, postcard (front)

In celebration of Women’s History Month, NoMAA in partnership with Broadway Housing Communities and the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling present the exhibition “Women in the Heights – Disruption,” featuring the work of 28 women artists of Uptown Manhattan. Curated by Andrea Arroyo.

Location: Rio II Gallery, 583 Riverside Dr (at 135th St), New York, NY 10031

Dates: 10–30 March 2017
Gallery hours: Mon–Fri 10am–5pm; free and open to the public

Opening reception: Friday 10 March 2017, 6–9pm

Artists talk: Wednesday 22 March 2017, 6–8pm

Participating artists: Beatriz Albuquerque, Karen Berman, Susan Bresler, Amara Clark, Rose Deler, Diane Drescher, Sharese Ann Frederick, Julann Gebbie, Xóchitl Gil-Higuchi, Michelle Orsi Gordon, Wilhelmina Grant, Dianne Hebbert, Maggie Hernandez, Fernanda Hubeaut, Anna Lambert, Lilia Levin, RoughAcres/RL McKee, Alexandra Momin, Nancy Palubniak, Lysander Puccio, Leticia Quezada, Nancy Rakoczy, Diana Schmertz, Adrienne Stamler, Renata Stein, Rachel Sydlowski, Yasuyo Tanaka and Yona Verwer/Katarzyna Kozera.

Artists talk and workshop

On Wednesday 22 March 2017, 6–8pm, join the artists of “Women in the Heights – Disruption” as they share their processes and visions, followed by the workshop titled “Facing today’s challenges as artists and citizens.” This workshop is appropriate for emerging and mid-career artists of all disciplines.

The artists talk/workshop is FREE and open to the public. RSVP ►

Women in the Heights 2017, postcard

NoMAA exhibition: Uptown Arts Review 2016

Uptown Arts Review 2016

Presented by NoMAA in partnership with Broadway Housing Communities and the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling, “Uptown Arts Review” is an exhibition showcasing the work of 29 local artists working in a variety of media. Curated by Andrea Arroyo.

Dates: 6–30 June 2016, during the Uptown Arts Stroll

Location: Rio II Gallery, 583 Riverside Dr (at W 135th St), New York, NY 10031

Opening reception: Monday 6 June 2016, 6–9pm

Artists talk and workshop: Monday 20 June 2016, 6–8pm (details below)

Participating artists: Sarah E. Alcántara, Brandy Bajalia, Yael Ben-Zion, Emily Bradley, Susan Bresler, Joana P. Cardozo, Diane Drescher, Aliya Frazier, Felipe Galindo, Katte Geneta, Xóchitl Cristina Gil-Higuchi, Michelle Orsi Gordon, Wilhelmina Grant, Cynthia Hartling, Shinsuke Higuchi, Josefa Jaime, Amaryllis León, Lilia Levin, Iván Martínez, Michelle Melo, Angela Miskis, Rosa Naparstek, Ydania Ogando, Diana Schmertz, Tony Serio, Elizabeth Starcevic, Yasuyo Tanaka, Lisa Turngren and Aislinn Weidele.

Free and open to the public; everyone is welcome!

Artists talk and workshop, “Best Practices in Marketing and Promotion”
Monday 20 June 2016, 6–8pm
Join the artists of “Uptown Arts Review” as they share their processes and visions, followed by the workshop “Best Practices in Marketing and Promotion,” where curator Andrea Arroyo will share the best art marketing tools, including online and hard-copy portfolios and other promotional materials. This workshop is appropriate for emerging and mid-career artists of all disciplines.

Women Artists Salon – Ask a Professional

Please join the artists of “Women in the Heights – Transitions” as they share their processes and visions, followed by “Ask a Professional” where curator Andrea Arroyo will address questions on career development, professional practices and available artists’ opportunities. Date: 23 March 2016.

Date: Wednesday, 23 March 2016, 6–8 p.m.

Location: Rio III Gallery, Sugar Hill Building, 898 St Nicholas Avenue (at 155th Street), 9th floor, New York, NY

RSVP now

Please join the artists of Women in the Heights – Transitions as they share their processes and visions, followed by “Ask a Professional” where curator Andrea Arroyo will address questions on career development, professional practices and available artists’ opportunities.

The event is free and open to the public. Everyone is welcome!

Participating artists: Gloria Adams, Coqle Aragrev, Eileen Burgess, Amara Clark, Karin Dando Haenisch, Montserrat Daubon, Tiffany Dugan, Risa Ehrlich, Mira Gandy, Julann Gebbie, Vanessa Germosen, Xóchitl Cristina Gil-Higuchi, Wilhelmina Obatola Grant, Cynthia Hartling, Carla Hernandez, Ayo Janeen Jackson, Andrea Kornbluth, Amaryllis León, Hye Ryung Na, Rosa Naparstek, Eva Nikolova, Nancy Palubniak, Stina Petersen, Imani Razat, Sarah Rowe, Susan Stair, Yasuyo Tanaka, Ching Wen Tsai, Minerva Urrutia, Aislinn Weidele.

NoMAA exhibition: Women in the Heights – Transitions

In celebration of Women’s History Month, NoMAA, in partnership with Broadway Housing Communities and The Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling, presents the exhibition “Women in the Heights – Transitions,” featuring the work of thirty women artists of Uptown Manhattan. Dates: 4–29 March 2016. Opening reception: 4 March 2016.

NoMAA Exhibition: Women in the Heights – Transitions

Location: Rio III Gallery, Sugar Hill Building, 898 St Nicholas Avenue (at 155th Street), 9th floor, New York, NY 10032

Dates: 4–29 March 2016

Gallery hours: Monday–Thursday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., or by appointment (call +1 212 568-2030)

Opening reception: Friday 4 March 2016, 6–9 p.m.

Artists’ Salon and “Ask a Professional”: Wednesday 23 March 2016, 6–8 p.m.

In celebration of Women’s History Month, the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance, in partnership with Broadway Housing Communities and The Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling, presents the exhibition Women in the Heights – Transitions, featuring the work of thirty women artists of Uptown Manhattan. Curated by Andrea Arroyo.

Participating Artists: Gloria Adams, Coqle Aragrev, Eileen Burgess, Amara Clark, Karin DandoHaenisch, Montserrat Daubon, Tiffany Dugan, Risa Ehrlich, Mira Gandy, Julann Gebbie, Vanessa Germosen, Xóchitl Cristina Gil-Higuchi, Wilhelmina Obatola Grant, Cynthia Hartling, Carla Hernandez, Ayo Janeen Jackson, Andrea Kornbluth, Amaryllis León, Hye Ryung Na, Rosa Naparstek, Eva Nikolova, Nancy Palubniak, Stina Petersen, Imani Razat, Sarah Rowe, Susan Stair, Yasuyo Tanaka, Ching Wen Tsai, Minerva Urrutia, Aislinn Weidele.

Free and open to the public.

Photos from the opening reception

Women in the Heights – Transitions – Opening reception

NoMAA Gallery: Selfless SelfiesGalería NoMAA: Selfless Selfies

NoMAA is pleased to invite you to Selfless Selfies, a black & white exhibit by uptown photographers, narrating stories about our communities. Dates: 16 October – 19 November 2014. Opening reception: 16 October. Artist talk: 28 October.Unáse a nosotros para esta exposición de fotografías en blanco y negro tomadas por fotógrafos del Alto Manhattan que relatan historias de nuestras comunidades. Fechas: 16 de octubre al 19 de noviembre de 2014. Inauguración: 16 de octubre. Charla con los artistas: 28 de octubre.

NoMAA Gallery: Selfless Selfies - postcard
PDF version

NoMAA is pleased to invite you to Selfless Selfies, a black & white exhibit by Upper Manhattan photographers, narrating stories about our communities. Curated by Michael J. Palma.

Dates: 16 October 2014 – 16 January 2015 (extended)
Hours: Monday–Friday, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., and by appointment.

Location: NoMAA Gallery178 Bennett Avenue, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10040

Opening reception: 16 October 2014, 6–8 p.m.
Artist talk: 28 October 2014, 6:30 p.m. Extended gallery hours until 9 p.m.

RSVP: 

Photographers: Gio Andollo, Shavell Bailley, Cathleen Campbell, Ken Carew, Flavia Dilonez, Jardae DuBois Marshall, Erika Norton-Urie, Borroughs Lamar, Ray A. Llanos, RoughAcres/RL McKee, Maritza Melendez, Lamar Metcalf, Daniela Mullady, Beluvid Ola-Jendai, José Olivares, Edison Peña, Antonio Pertuz, Charles Quiles, Judith Raices, Jeff Reuben, James A. Ridley, Nelson Salcedo, Matt Shanley, Arlene Schulman, Tom Stoelker, Rafaelina Tineo/Dhyana, Eric K. Washington, Eni Xhori, David Vades Joseph and Feruze Zeko.

Sponsored by:

Columbia Wine Co. Hispanic Federation New York City Department of Cultural Affairs Lambent Foundation

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Galería NoMAA: Selfless Selfies - postal
Versión PDF

Unáse a nosotros para esta exposición de fotografías en blanco y negro tomadas por fotógrafos del Alto Manhattan que relatan historias de nuestras comunidades. Curador: Michael J. Palma.

Fechas: 16 de octubre de 2014 a 16 de enero de 2015
Horario: lunes a viernes, 11 a.m. a 6 p.m., y por cita.

Ubicación: Galería NoMAAAvenida Bennett, no. 178, 3er piso, New York, NY 10040

Inauguración: 16 de octubre de 2014, 6–8 p.m.
Charla con los artistas: 28 de octubre de 2014, 6:30 p.m. Horario extendido hasta las 9 p.m.

RSVP: 

Fotógrafos: Gio Andollo, Shavell Bailley, Cathleen Campbell, Ken Carew, Flavia Dilonez, Jardae DuBois Marshall, Erika Norton-Urie, Borroughs Lamar, Ray A. Llanos, RoughAcres/RL McKee, Maritza Melendez, Lamar Metcalf, Daniela Mullady, Beluvid Ola-Jendai, José Olivares, Edison Peña, Antonio Pertuz, Charles Quiles, Judith Raices, Jeff Reuben, James A. Ridley, Nelson Salcedo, Matt Shanley, Arlene Schulman, Tom Stoelker, Rafaelina Tineo/Dhyana, Eric K. Washington, Eni Xhori, David Vades Joseph y Feruze Zeko.

Patrocinada por by:

Columbia Wine Co. Hispanic Federation New York City Department of Cultural Affairs Lambent Foundation

Este programa cuenta con el apoyo parcial de fondos públicos proporcionados por el Departamento de Asuntos Culturales de la Ciudad de Nueva York en asociación con el Concejo Municipal.

Theater: La Caída de Rafael Trujillo

NoMAA is pleased to invite you to “La Caída de Rafael Trujillo” by Carmen Rivera, a play about the events that led to the implosion of a ruthless dictatorship. Date: 22 October 2014.

“Off Target” by Rider Ureña
“Off Target” by Rider Ureña

The Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance is pleased to invite you to

La Caída de Rafael Trujillo
by Carmen Rivera

A play about the events that led to the implosion of a ruthless dictatorship. [PDF flyer]

Date: Wednesday 22 October 2014, 6:30 p.m.

Place: Teatro Círculo, 64 East 4th St. New York, NY 10003

Tickets:

  • NoMAA Members $30 (limited amount)
  • Community Friends $75
  • Corporate Friends $150

learn more

A wine reception and conversation with the playwright and cast will follow the performance.

About the Playwright

Carmen Rivera, regarded as one of the most prolific U.S. Latina playwrights, is the creative force behind box office blockbuster’s such as “CELIA: The Life and Music of Celia Cruz” (co-written with Candido Tirado) and “La Lupe: My Life, My Destiny.” Her play, LA GRINGA, winner of the 1996 OBIE Award, is the longest running Latino show in Off Broadway history.

About the Production

Rivera’s work on LA CAIDA DE RAFAEL TRUJILLO spans more than five dedicated years of intensive scholarship, primary research, first-person interviews, as well as source material from CUNY’s acclaimed Institute for Dominican Studies and more.

This production will be directed by award-winning director Cándido Tirado and features a formidable pan-Latino cast: Iván Camilo (as Johnny Abbes), Johary Ramos (as ensemble/various roles), Adriana Sananes (as Doña María, wife of Gen. Trujillo), Marco Antonio Rodríguez (as Don Paco Escribano), Fermín Suárez (as Joaquin Balaguer), Ed Trucco (as Diplomat), Eva Cristina Vásquez (as the lover of Gen. Trujillo) and in the lead role of Trujillo, José Cheo Oliveras. Set design by Jorge Dieppa and lighting design by María Cristina Fusté.

Harry Nadal designed the historical costumes and Rubén Darío Cruz is the multimedia designer. For this production, noted Dominican scholar and historian José Novas has been the dramaturgical and cultural consultant and Bersaida Vega translated the play into Spanish.

NoMAA Gallery: Women in the Heights – Reflections on CreatingGalería NoMAA: Mujeres del Alto Manhattan – Meditaciones sobre la creación

In celebration of Women’s History Month, NoMAA presents Women in the Heights – Reflections on Creating, an exhibition displaying works by 25 women artists residing in Washington Heights, Inwood, El Barrio and Harlem. Dates: 5 March – 9 April 2014. Opening reception: 5 March. Artist talk: 19 March.Con motivo del Mes de la Mujer, NoMAA presenta Mujeres del Alto Manhattan – Meditaciones sobre la creación, una exposición de obras de 25 mujeres artistas residentes en Washington Heights, Inwood, El Barrio y Harlem. Fechas: 5 de marzo a 9 de abril de 2014. Inauguración: 5 de marzo. Charla con las artistas: 19 de marzo.

Women in the Heights – Reflections on Creating
View PDF invitation

In celebration of Women’s History Month, NoMAA presents Women in the Heights – Reflections on Creating, an exhibition displaying works by 25 women artists residing in Washington Heights, Inwood, El Barrio and Harlem, curated by Andrea Arroyo.

Location: NoMAA Gallery, 178 Bennett Avenue, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10040

Dates: 5 March – 9 April 2014

Gallery hours: Mon–Fri, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., or by appointment (call +1 212 568-4396). The gallery will be open on Saturday 8 March, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m., coinciding with International Women’s Day.

Opening reception: 5 March 2014, 6–8 p.m.

Artist talk: 19 March, 6:30 p.m. Extended gallery hours until 9 p.m.

Artists: Margaret Day, Kathleen Granados, Antonia Guerrero, Risa Hirsch Ehrlich, Samantha Holmes, Varese Layzer, Michelle Melo, Elaine Mokhtefi, Michelle Orsi Gordon, Nancy Palubniak, Sky Pape, Nancy Rakoczy, Danielle Rocio, Katrin Roos, Sarah Rowe, Adesina Sanchez, Diana Schmertz, Uraline Septembre Hager, Laura Shapiro, Ashli Sisk, Renata Stein, Rachel Sydlowski, Lisa Turngren, Marianne van den Bergh and Sandra Vergara.

Photos from the opening reception

[flickr-gallery mode=”photoset” photoset=”72157642571339494″]
 

Mujeres del Alto Manhattan – Meditaciones sobre la creación
Ver invitación (PDF)
Con motivo del Mes de la Mujer, la Alianza de Artes del Norte de Manhattan (NoMAA) presenta Mujeres del Alto Manhattan – Meditaciones sobre la creación, una exposición de obras de 25 mujeres artistas residentes en Washington Heights, Inwood, El Barrio y Harlem. Curadora: Andrea Arroyo.

Ubicación: Galería NoMAA, Avenida Bennett, no. 178, 3er piso, Nueva York, NY 10040

Fechas: 5 de marzo a 9 de abril de 2014

Horario: lunes a viernes, de 11 a.m. a 6 p.m., o por cita especial (llame al +1 212 568-4396). La galería estará abierta el sábado 8 de marzo, de 11 a.m. a 2 p.m., coincidiendo con el Día Internacional de la Mujer.

Recepción de inauguración: 5 de marzo de 2014, 6–8 p.m.

Charla con las artistas: 19 de marzo de 2014, 6:30 p.m. Galería abierta hasta las 9 p.m.

Artistas: Margaret Day, Kathleen Granados, Antonia Guerrero, Risa Hirsch Ehrlich, Samantha Holmes, Varese Layzer, Michelle Melo, Elaine Mokhtefi, Michelle Orsi Gordon, Nancy Palubniak, Sky Pape, Nancy Rakoczy, Danielle Rocio, Katrin Roos, Sarah Rowe, Adesina Sanchez, Diana Schmertz, Uraline Septembre Hager, Laura Shapiro, Ashli Sisk, Renata Stein, Rachel Sydlowski, Lisa Turngren, Marianne van den Bergh y Sandra Vergara.

Fotos de la inauguración

[flickr-gallery mode=”photoset” photoset=”72157642571339494″]
 

At the Crossroads of Art and ActivismEn la encrucijada del arte y el activismo

The current show at Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance (NoMAA), “Immigrant Too,” features the work of local artists who are all from different countries. This past Thurs., Oct. 31st, a discussion explored the overlap between being both an immigrant and an artist. Led by curator Gabriel de Guzmán, it was a frank and intimate conversation about the struggles and complexities of both.La exhibición actual en la Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance, “Immigrant Too”, presenta el trabajo de artistas locales, quienes son todos de diferentes países. Una charla el pasado jueves 31 de octubre exploró las coincidencias entre ser tanto un inmigrante como un artista. Liderados por el curador Gabriel de Guzmán, fue una conversación franca e íntima sobre las luchas y las complejidades de los dos.

Story and photos by Sherry Mazzocchi. Reprinted with permission from The Manhattan Times.

The lives of artists and immigrants resonate with each other.

They often consider themselves as outsiders who don’t feel at home anywhere and use creativity and resourcefulness to survive.

“Immigrant Too” was curated by Gabriel de Guzmán (left), and Angela Fernández, Director of the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights, participated in a forum on the exhibit.
“Immigrant Too” was curated by Gabriel de Guzmán (left), and Angela Fernández, Director of the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights, participated in a forum on the exhibit.
The current show at Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance (NoMAA), “Immigrant Too,” features the work of local artists who are all from different countries. This past Thurs., Oct. 31st, a discussion explored the overlap between being both an immigrant and an artist.

Led by curator Gabriel de Guzmán, it was a frank and intimate conversation about the struggles and complexities of both.

In the work Fourth of July, two Mexican men look at fireworks through a hole in a border fence. The fence’s red stripes and the white sparks against blue sky resemble an American flag.

Artist Felipe Galindo said he created the work on a deadline. At the time, he wasn’t sure if he wanted them to cross. “They are contemplating—they are not crossing,” he said.

But in an animated version of the work, a coyote appears and says that for a certain amount of money they can get in a truck and cross the border. The truck resembles a slave ship with skeletons. Coyotes, or smugglers, often put a lot of people in trucks, and sometimes abandon them and the people die, said Galindo.

They decline the coyote’s offer. Instead, they find a boat, the Flor de Mayo. It has no oars, so the women extend their traditional Mexican dresses like sails. It arrives in Manhattan.

“I gave them the image of the Mayflower,” he said. “So we are all in the same boat.”

Immigrants and artists are often in the same boat when it comes to money.

Renata Stein had financial problems when she first arrived in the U.S. Art supplies were too expensive so she used found objects in her work. “Being able to use detritus was a lifesaver,” she said.

Immigrants are resourceful, said Angela Fernández, Executive Director of the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights (NMCIR). Many arrive with little money or knowledge of the language. “The level of creativity required to survive can be compared to an artist’s level of creativity,” she said.

Yet creativity and resourcefulness can only take you so far. Many artists and immigrants have low incomes, which makes gentrification a threat. Escalating rent drives both types of people out of neighborhoods they once called home. “New York is a great city,” said Sandra García-Betancourt, NoMAA’s Executive Director, “if we can afford it.”

Artists and immigrants both enrich the greater culture, but in different ways, said Rosa Naparstek. Immigrants are outsiders who are usually trying to find a way in. Yet artists tend stand apart from society.

Artists Andrea Arroyo, Leandro Cruz, Lina Puerta, and Felipe Galindo.
Artists Andrea Arroyo, Leandro Cruz, Lina Puerta, and Felipe Galindo.
“Each has a sensibility that has something to contribute to the collective,” said Naparstek, “An immigrant tries to acclimate and assimilate. But they are also bringing in a cultural diversity of ideas that enrich.”

Like many immigrants, artists often don’t feel at home where ever they are. It is a kind of limbo, said Betancourt. “As an artist, do you feel that you belong to any place? Do you have to?”

Artists change perspectives, and so do immigrants when they cross borders. Yael Ben-Zion said her identity shifts when she goes back and forth from Israel to the U.S. “It’s very liberating, actually, because I feel that I don’t belong. It gives me the freedom to do whatever I want.”

Fernández said immigrant’s rights are under threat and thousands of families feel the pain of having a loved one detained or deported. She talked about the Dream 30, a group of immigrants who left the U.S. and returned. While some of them have been released, at least one has been deported. Others are sitting in detention, and have commenced a hunger strike to call attention to their plight.

Not all immigrants are activists and not every artist is political. Yet sometimes the politics is not overt.

Andrea Arroyo’s abstract images reflect the hundreds of dead people found at Arizona border crossings each year.

People don’t always see her activism, she said, but social justice issues inform her work.

“As an artist you just try to create the best work. Sometimes they don’t marry. Sometimes they do.”

It is important to be an activist, said Naparstek, but fundamental change needs to happen at a deep level.

Just going to demonstrations isn’t a solution, she said.

”It has not satisfied the profound changes that need to happen in all of us—to start the kind of change that will actually alter the consciousness that can alter the way we are in the world.”

Among the artists included in the “Immigrant Too” exhibition are Grace Aneiza Ali, Andrea Arroyo, Javier Ávila, Yael Ben-Zion, Pablo Caviedes, Leandro Cruz, Francisco Donoso, Alexis Duque, Felipe Galindo, Peter J. Hoffmeister, Rafaela Luna, Javier Maria, Michelle Melo, Joiri Minaya, Rosa Naparstek, Lina Puerta, Renata Stein, and Hidemi Takagi.

The exhibit is at the NoMAA Gallery, located at 178 Bennett Avenue (at 189th Street), 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10040 until November 21st, 2013.

The gallery hours are Mon–Fri, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., or by appointment (please call +1 212 568-4396).Artículo y fotos de Sherry Mazzocchi. Reproducido con el permiso de The Manhattan Times.

La vida de los artistas y de los inmigrantes resuena entre sí. A menudo se consideran a sí mismos como extranjeros, con frecuencia no se sienten que ningún lugar es su hogar y utilizan la creatividad y el ingenio para sobrevivir.

““Immigrant Too” fue curada por Gabriel de Guzmán (a la izquierda), y Ángela Fernández, Directora de la Coalición del Norte de Manhattan para los Derechos de los Inmigrantes, participó en un foro en la exposición.
“Immigrant Too” fue curada por Gabriel de Guzmán (a la izquierda), y Ángela Fernández, Directora de la Coalición del Norte de Manhattan para los Derechos de los Inmigrantes, participó en un foro en la exposición.
La exhibición actual en la Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance, “Immigrant Too”, presenta el trabajo de artistas locales, quienes son todos de diferentes países. Una charla el pasado jueves 31 de octubre exploró las coincidencias entre ser tanto un inmigrante como un artista.

Liderados por el curador Gabriel de Guzmán, fue una conversación franca e íntima sobre las luchas y las complejidades de los dos.

En la obra “Cuatro de julio”, dos hombres mexicanos miran los fuegos artificiales a través de un agujero en un muro en la frontera. Las rayas rojas de la cerca y las chispas blancas contra el cielo azul parecen a una bandera estadounidense.

El artista, Felipe Galindo, dijo que creó la obra en una fecha límite.

En ese momento no estaba seguro de si quería que ellos cruzaran. “Ellos están pensando, no están cruzando”, dijo.

Pero en una versión animada de la obra, aparece un coyote y dice que por una cierta cantidad de dinero pueden subir en un camión y cruzar la frontera. El camión se asemeja a un barco de esclavos con esqueletos. Coyotes o contrabandistas, a menudo ponen un montón de gente en los camiones, y a veces los abandonan y mueren personas, dijo Galindo.

Ellos rechazan la oferta del coyote. En su lugar, encuentran un barco, el Flor de Mayo. No tiene remos, por lo que las mujeres extienden sus vestidos tradicionales mexicanos como velas. Llega a Manhattan.

“Les di la imagen del Mayflower”, dijo. “Así que todos estamos en el mismo barco”.

Los inmigrantes y los artistas están a menudo en el mismo barco cuando se trata de dinero. Renata Stein tuvo problemas financieros cuando llegó por primera vez a Estados Unidos. Los insumos de arte eran demasiado caros, así que utilizó objetos que encontraba en su trabajo. “Ser capaz de utilizar desperdicios fue un salvavidas”, dijo.

Los inmigrantes son ingeniosos, dijo Ángela Fernández, directora ejecutiva de la Coalición del Norte de Manhattan para los Derechos de los Inmigrantes (NMCIR por sus siglas en inglés). Muchos llegan con poco dinero o conocimiento de la lengua. “El nivel de creatividad requerido para sobrevivir puede ser comparado con el nivel de creatividad de un artista”, dijo.

La creatividad y el ingenio no siempre te pueden llevar muy lejos. Muchos artistas e inmigrantes tienen ingresos bajos, lo que hace el aburguesamiento una amenaza. El aumento del alquiler impulsa a ambos tipos de personas fuera de los barrios que alguna vez llamaron hogar. “Nueva York es una gran ciudad”, dijo Sandra García Betancourt, directora ejecutiva de NoMAA, “si podemos pagarla”.

Artistas e inmigrantes enriquecen la cultura pero de diferentes maneras, dijo Rosa Naparstek. Los inmigrantes son extranjeros que están, por lo general, tratando de encontrar una manera de entrar y los artistas suelen estar al margen de la sociedad.

Los artistas Andrea Arroyo, Leandro Cruz, Lina Puerta y Felipe Galindo.
Los artistas Andrea Arroyo, Leandro Cruz, Lina Puerta y Felipe Galindo.
“Cada uno tiene una sensibilidad que aporta algo a la colectividad”, dijo Naparstek, “Un inmigrante intenta aclimatarse y asimilar. Pero también están trayendo una diversidad cultural de ideas que enriquecen”.

Como muchos inmigrantes, los artistas a menudo no se sienten en casa en donde quiera que estén. Es una especie de limbo, dijo Betancourt. “Como artista, ¿sientes que perteneces a algún lugar? ¿Tienes que?”

Los artistas cambian las perspectivas, y también lo hacen los inmigrantes cuando cruzan las fronteras. Yael Ben-Zion dijo que su identidad cambia cuando ella va y viene de Israel a los Estados Unidos. “Es muy liberador, en realidad, porque siento que no pertenezco. Me da la libertad para hacer lo que quiera”.

Fernández dijo que los derechos de los inmigrantes están en peligro y miles de familias sienten el dolor de tener un ser querido detenido o deportado. Ella habló sobre Dream 30, un grupo de inmigrantes que salieron de los Estados Unidos y regresaron. Si bien algunos de ellos han sido puestos en libertad, al menos uno ha sido deportado. Otros están sentados en prisión, y han comenzado una huelga de hambre para llamar la atención sobre su difícil situación.

No todos los inmigrantes son activistas, y no todo artista es político. Sin embargo, a veces, la política no es evidente.

Las imágenes abstractas de Andrea Arroyo reflejan cientos de muertos encontrados en los pasos fronterizos de Arizona cada año.

La gente no siempre percibe su activismo, dijo, pero los problemas de justicia social, informan su trabajo. “Como artista sólo intentas crear el mejor trabajo. A veces te casas. A veces no.

“Es importante ser activista”, dijo Naparstek, pero el cambio fundamental tiene que ocurrir a un nivel profundo. Asistir a las manifestaciones no es una solución”, dijo. “No se han producido los cambios profundos que necesitan ocurrir en todos nosotros para iniciar la clase de cambio que realmente modificará la conciencia sobre la manera en que existimos en el mundo”.

Entre los artistas incluidos en la exhibición “Immigrant Too” se encuentran: Grace Aneiza Ali, Andrea Arroyo, Javier Ávila, Yael Ben-Zion, Pablo Caviedes, Leandro Cruz, Francisco Donoso, Alexis Duque, Felipe Galindo, Peter J. Hoffmeister, Rafaela Luna, Javier Maria, Michelle Melo, Joiri Minaya, Rosa Naparstek, Lina Puerta, Renata Stein y Hidemi Takagi.

La exhibición se encuentra en la Galería NoMAA, localizada en el número 178 de la avenida Bennett (en la calle 189), tercer piso, Nueva York, NY 10040, hasta el 21 de noviembre de 2013.

El horario de la galería es de lunes a viernes de 11 a.m. a 6 p.m., o por cita (por favor llame al +1 212 568-4396).